Meta: We are all Kate Harding, but some of us are more Kate Harding than others

One thing we’ve consistently had bloggerly trouble with around here is people getting confused about who writes which post. Our WordPress layout doesn’t help us out, so we put our icons in our posts to help out. However, given that FJ and I are pseudonymous and Kate isn’t, people still tend to get confused, since my icon has been a “Do Not Approach Wildlife” sign (what! I’m a sucker for sign iconography) and FJ’s has been, well, a fillyjonk, which I think maybe three people have recognized ever, tops. When I realized that even Mr Machine was not registering which post was written by whom (Mr M: “Hey, you know that thing Kate said on the blog about X?” SM: “Hey, that was me!”), it seemed time to take action. After all, he is, AFAIK, the only person besides FJ’s mom who has actually met all three of us IRL — if he can’t figure out who’s who online, then how can Joe Comment? And, of course, it doesn’t help that we’re all Kates Harding in the first place.

I asked our incredibly talented FJ if she was willing to make us (except Kate!) more representative icons so that we could be at least recognizably pseudonymous, and she agreed because she is awesome. So, I present you: me!

Hello everyone! In person my skin is exactly that clear, and my hair is adorably messy at all times. I have no personal problems whatsoever.

Keep an eye out for FJ’s new icon, to be debuted soon. And jesus, isn’t she talented? Seriously. If I drew my own icon it would look like a mangled smiley face. With glasses.

So remember: Kate’s the famous one. FJ’s the one who can draw. And I’m the one with glasses.

30 thoughts on “Meta: We are all Kate Harding, but some of us are more Kate Harding than others

  1. That reminds me vaguely of the the mantra my parents use to keep me and my sister straight. “Shorty likes zuchhini, Shinobi likes to get the mail.”

    Obviously, I am weird.

  2. Aw. I will miss the Fillyjonk icon. Small beasts from Moomin Valley are underrepresented. :C

    Nonetheless, that is very awesome.

  3. Okay, This made me very curious about “fillyjonk” which I had presumed was something that was totally unique to her. Google is my friend and I found out it is a very appropriate name:

    Fillyjonk (Filifjonkan) – Known as The Fillyjonk in some English translations, … Not a single moment of fantasy or joy, only duties and discipline; she is an extremely methodical person tied down with principles and has a deep rooted belief in prestige and tradition. Nevertheless, after a catastrophe, The Fillyjonk can be freed from the trammels of social expectation and can discover the joys of freedom, irrationality and self-expression. Deep inside she has had a wish to live freely as the Moomin family does, without any worries.

    I’ve heard of the Moomin but had not read any. I like the description saying that Fillyjonk is freed from social expectation, etc. What a lovely choice of pseudonym.

  4. Looks good!

    Now I wonder how long it’ll take me before I mess up and type the wrong name ANYWAY? ;)

  5. Great icon! But, er, you might want to change the actual name of the file you’re linking to… just a suggestion. ;)

  6. Oh, count me in on fillyjonk knowledge! I grew up on the Moomins. Wonderful, wonderful books–what a pity they aren’t more widespread.

  7. Huh, I thought I had changed that when I uploaded the pic, but Kate’s right — my first name has been floating around for a while. Someone who’s just aching to figure out who I am probably can, but I’d be surprised. Thanks for the catch, though, Sheana. :-)

    Julia, we’re internet twins!

  8. Yeah, a fillyjonk (at least the one who believes in disasters) is basically a big ball of irrational anxiety until the roof actually (literally) collapses, at which point she overcomes her neuroses and discovers the joy of chaos. This is how I tend to operate (bundle of nerves in peacetime, calmest person around in a crisis), but it was also a tongue-in-cheek reference to the anxiety I felt at signing on with the blog.

    She’ll be around for at least a day or two, because I’ve not had any time to work on my icon or Kate’s. (And right now I’m not logged in so y’all get my monster instead.)

  9. I’ll miss the fillyjonk, too. The Moomin books are charm and quirk and depth all at once, and I adore them.

    Though I’ve often had to remind myself that the icon is NOT the same as Fillyjonk the blogger. I’ve tended to conflate the two, and be startled by, say, fatshion photos of the real Fillyjonk. (Wait a minute… real… fictional… I am getting confused!)

  10. Wait … moomins?? That’s so cool!! :D

    Anyway, I always wondered why some posts had icons at the beginning and some didn’t. Looks like you actually insert them manually? That would explain it.

  11. Holy cow – I think I’m a Fillyjonk too. I’ve always wanted to ask, but was always afraid to sound dumb.

    In my opinion, all three of you are famous in my book.

  12. I used to be the worst about forgetting to insert my icon — and when we started using them, I didn’t go back and put icons into all the old posts. (Some, but not all.)

    Also, I sometimes don’t use my icon if all I’m posting is a picture or a video, ’cause my little head squashed against the big image in question looks ridiculous.

  13. Uh-oh.

    I’m starting to think I’m not actually Kate Harding, after all. Turns out I’m actually sweetmachine!

    (seriously, your stylized icon is almost identical to what a stylized me would look like.)

    But then, if sweetmachine is Kate Harding, then that would make me…..

    I’m so confused.

  14. I’m glad about that, because I was worried that I’d done TOO GOOD OF A JOB and made you recognizable.

    Now people will just think you’re rhiain or Julia.

  15. More than one Fillyjonk? Moomins? These are wonderful books that I don’t know anything about?!?

    Please tell me more; they sound great & I would love to read them.

  16. Katia, I recommend Tales from Moominvalley as a starting point — it’s short stories and introduces a lot of the characters, including the Fillyjonk Who Believed in Disasters. It’s also super, super dark, so be advised that kids who read it early might grow up like me, especially if they also read a lot of Gorey.

Comments are closed.