Thinking Thin

Update: Zuzu wrote way more interesting stuff about the Ream article than I did. Go read that.

Please check out this excellent piece by Anne Ream in the Chicago Tribune about what happened when “overwork, Third World travel and Problems with a Man” caused her to drop enough weight to become a size 0.

Hint: nobody remarked that she looked sick.

She uses that experience as a jumping off point for talking about women’s fear of taking up space, literally and figuratively.

What is going on here? It’s bad enough that our dress sizes are shrinking to 0, but so too is our common sense and our understanding of health, wellness and lasting beauty. Most distressingly, our ambitions are shrinking as well.

Ream mentions successful starlets who say they secretly want to give it all up to look after their husbands, T-shirts that say “Property of My Boyfriend,” and this:

When Hillary Clinton publicly jokes about her problems losing weight, she appears to be speaking in focus-group code: Don’t hate me because I’m smart and ambitious. I want to be skinny too.

Right fuckin’ on, Anne. Sadly.

The fact that Hillary Clinton even feels the need to comment publicly on her weight infuriates me. (Uh, you think?) And the fact that she would berate herself for it just makes me want to cry. I understand that all candidates are subject to weight scrutiny, but I honestly don’t see how Clinton could conceivably be considered “overweight,” unless we expect our presidential candidates to look like 17-year-old supermodels. She’s almost 60 years old. She’s had a baby. She looks healthy and radiant and… really pretty small. Who the fuck thinks she’s fat?

Well, she does, apparently. Or at least, she’s savvy enough to know that claiming she does will make it easier for women voters to relate to her, as Ream points out. Either way… GAAAAAAAH.

You know what? I don’t want a president who puts in the time and effort required to be stick thin. I want a president who is healthy enough to do her job, and who takes her job seriously enough that she thinks spending two hours in the gym every day would be an unconscionable waste of time.

And I want a president who is ambitious, thank you very much. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: when we’re talking about a candidate for PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, how the fuck can “too ambitious” be seen as a serious criticism?

Oh, right, it’s a woman. A woman who wants to be president is, by definition, “too ambitious.” Because the president doesn’t have time to cook and clean and spend all her remaining time trying to look like a teenager. The president can’t be a “real woman.” And we can’t have that.

Kudos to Ream for highlighting the connection between tiny ambitions and the unrealistic pursuit of tiny bodies. In a culture where men are told to “think big” and women are told to “think thin,” it’s something that can’t be said enough.

49 thoughts on “Thinking Thin

  1. Hillary is not fat, at all. How crazy is this? And I hate to take the Noonan approach, but what about the children? Girls (young women) in this country need a strong role model, and I can’t think of anyone more fitting for that than Pres. Hillary Clinton. That would speak volumes to so many, but she has to take the patriarchial line of, “Well, I may be educated, powerful, ambitious, and in control of my destiny (as well as the country), but I’m just not good enough until I’m a size 4.” Fuck! Gimme a break.

  2. Well said. The pressures to look young and thin both take away women’s power – you have to look too small to do anything, and too young to have done anything.

    Oh, and when a male peer dismissively assumes I’m ten years junior to him, I’m supposed to take it as a compliment. Grr.

  3. Campos has a whole chapter on the link between Clinton’s weight (that would be Bill) and the whole Monica Lewinski thing. But the most interesting part was that it was really Hillary behind the scene who recognized that Bill’s weight could be considered a political liability. So I imagine that she’s pretty savvy about the issue of weight and control in the American public’s psyche.

    I’m not saying it’s right, I’m just saying.

  4. I liked this:

    “The truth is that loving oneself — and one’s body — is a discipline all its own. It means challenging the images that the fashion industry has foisted on us. It means ignoring the voices that tell us that being healthy is a distant second to being thin. It means celebrating female ambitions — our own, and other women’s — instead of downplaying or deriding them.”

    Hell, yes. I’ve tried to explain this to friends who insist on making comments like “I wish I had the willpower to be anorexic,” and I’ve never been able to do it so well.

  5. I want a president who is healthy enough to do her job, and who takes her job seriously enough that she thinks spending two hours in the gym every day would be an unconscionable waste of time.

    HELLS YEAH. Honestly, I can’t think of a job besides pro athlete in which spending two hours every day at the gym would NOT be a waste of time, but especially if you’re the damn President. More important things to worry about SRSLY.

    I liked this article, too, though I wish it had been a bit longer–it felt a little undeveloped to me, but I guess that’s a consequence of the medium.

  6. I’m more of a Barak Obama fan, but the ways in which people are discussing Clinton’s weight and wardrobe as if those are more valid than her actual political views just disgusts me. I think this reasoning is right on – she’s not paying attention to what proper women are supposed to obsess over.

    Barf!

    You know, I really never thought I’d see such blatant “unnatural woman” arguments outside of a Renaissance Poetry and Prose class. headshake*

  7. Excellent post, Kate.

    Naomi Wolf had this nailed in her book “The Beauty Myth.”

    “Dieting is the most potent political sedative in women’s history. A quietly mad population is a tractable one.”

    And yes, it’s about being afraid of taking up too much space, of being too powerful, too *much*. I’m glad to see this idea actually getting some traction outside of reminist and size acceptance circles.

  8. The fact that Hillary Clinton even feels the need to comment publicly on her weight infuriates me.

    I blame goddamn Mike Huckabee.

    But also, there’s the perception that “overweight” = “lazy, undisciplined, weak.” It’s obviously an incorrect perception, but as long as the public holds that perception, any savvy candidate is going to be sure to do everything possible to remove any implication that she’s lazy, undisciplined, and/or weak.

    Fat = immoral, dontcha know? (Never mind the fact that the most immoral president our country has seen is currently trim and svelte, which shoots THAT correlation right out of the water.)

  9. This made me cry.

    “The truth is that loving oneself — and one’s body — is a discipline all its own. It means challenging the images that the fashion industry has foisted on us. It means ignoring the voices that tell us that being healthy is a distant second to being thin. It means celebrating female ambitions — our own, and other women’s — instead of downplaying or deriding them.”

    If I weren’t in public, I would be bawling. Someone publicly acknowledged that loving yourself in our society takes discipline…when so many want to tell us that it makes us lazy and undisciplined. I have to write this woman and thank her for speaking out like this. Thanks for the heads up.

  10. And I want a president who is ambitious, thank you very much. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: when we’re talking about a candidate for PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, how the fuck can “too ambitious” be seen as a serious criticism?

    Post-Bush, nobody over age 6 with any functioning brain cells has any right to fall for the “aw shucks, you don’t mean me, I’m just a country boy at heart” routine in a Presidential candidate. You become Pres in this country for one of two reasons: 1) Relentless ambition out the yingyang, or 2) becoming a decorative mouthpiece for people with relentless ambition out the yingyang who don’t have the face or the body or the (gack) personal charisma to get elected.

    But yeah, you get HRC vilified for her ambition, and Obama ditto. Only white guys are supposed to be ambitious. And even they had better be tall and thin.

  11. Even newborns take up too much space, it seems.

    It’s so sad that the richest, most well-fed nation in the world has such terrible issues with food and weight.

  12. That Feministing piece (re that story about “anti-obesity infant formula” in the NY Times) and comments are replete with upper-class-twittery about the “disease” of “obesity,” and how we greedy fatties just can’t stop eating (or feeding to their puling offspring) all the tempting gooodeeees that slim people evidently have no problem passing up. (I’m not registered there so I can’t freep it, but if you are, please feel free.)

    Even many of our fellow so-called feminists don’t think self-esteem should extend much if at all beyond a size 12; yes, even the piece KH mentions above says to tell a size 14 that she’s gorgeous, but one gets the feeling she’d draw the line at telling a size 20 or 28 or 36 that. After all, we don’t want to encourage those face-stuffing moocows to keep consuming the “glistening mounds of ice cream and oceans of soda” that fatties all indulging in night ‘n’ day, now do we?

  13. She also gets tagged as “too angry to be president,” as well.

    I’m wondering if Hillary’s self-deprecation on this score is partly a way to connect with women voters, but also partly a way of getting the press to leave her the hell alone about her weight. She undoubtedly saw how Bill’s weight was used against him, and now Al Gore’s. And she’s used self-deprecation as a weapon before, by acknowledging that people get fixated on her look, particularly the significance of the changes in hairstyle over the years.

  14. At the end of the article, Anne Ream mentions that she’s 15 lbs heavier and people have stopped asking her who her nutritionist is. 15 lbs heavier than a size zero is what, at most a size 4? (In my size, I can gain or lose 15 lbs and still fit in the same pair of jeans.) And she’s too big to be considered attractively thin anymore? What IS this?

  15. I have to admit, I liked Ream’s article. I particularly liked the conclusion, although I may be a little biased, being a Fat Chick (and proud of it) myself.

    “The truth is that loving oneself — and one’s body — is a discipline all its own. It means challenging the images that the fashion industry has foisted on us. It means ignoring the voices that tell us that being healthy is a distant second to being thin. It means celebrating female ambitions — our own, and other women’s — instead of downplaying or deriding them.”

    The only way I’ve found of being able to do this in current Australian culture (which is less extreme about a lot of things than US culture) is to effectively give up the accepted female social role. I don’t buy “women’s magazines”, I don’t watch “women’s programs” on television (or indeed, any television) and I’m not massively interested in what the mainstream media decides are “women’s issues”. I spend a lot of time dodging the kinds of messages that society would like me to be listening to (I’ll listen to my CD collection rather than the radio, watch DVDs rather than television, read the newspaper rather than the magazines, and stay at home rather than going out). I’ll admit, it helps a lot that I’m honestly not interested in the majority of “women’s” this that and the other out there. I don’t see myself as being confined to being interested in the home, the kitchen, the doings of the so-called “famous”, the latest fashions, and the art of keeping my man interested by providing him with mind-blowing sex. I’m much more than that.

    I’d love to see a “women’s magazine” which celebrated real women, rather than those who conform to the social blueprint (actually there was one of those in Australia, but it shut down about 7 years ago). Until there’s one of those available, I’ll stick with the three organic gardening magazines I get regularly, and the occasional book of crosswords.

    To anyone out there who hasn’t already done this: I’d urge you to start thinking about what the social messages you’re receiving are doing to you. Are you being encouraged to be more or less than you can be?

  16. Meg,
    I think that is an amazing point. Everything geared towards women focuses at some point or another on weight issues, and there is just no avoiding it. You can barely have a conversation with women without weight loss coming up.

    Personally I find a lot of the female focused things insipid at best and patronizing at worst. I tend to avoid these things almost entirely. Though on occasion some of the girly channels have good movies or fun shows.

    But y’know I figure, I do my thing, and if someone else doesn’t like it, well… they know exactly where they can stick it.

  17. I got a similar vibe, Meowser, though maybe its progress even if it just wasn’t stated outright. But she did specifically focus on the gap between size 0’s and size 14’s which seemed like a weird turn of phrase. Was it unintentional, or was it meant to exclude size 16’s and up? I hope I’m just being too sensitive, but you’re right that there is a big camp who want size acceptance unless you’re an unacceptable size. Still, the article makes some very good observations regardless of whether we’re who she was ultimately talking about.

  18. I think she focused on size 14s because she stated earlier that that was the average size for a woman and our perceptions are so skewed from that – I don’t know her opinion on larger women, but I don’t know that it’s possible to infer that from the article.

  19. The whole thing makes me want to punch walls, to be frank.

    How much human energy and brainpower is going down the drain every day being wasted on ‘omigawd my thighs are huge!’ and the rest of the fat madness? Never mind the dollars that go into the diet industry, diet pills, diet food and ‘news’ about how being fat is worse than the polar ice caps melting.

    Women aren’t supposed to be too big, too smart, too loud, too ambitious- and it takes a lot of time and a lot of effort to keep those reminders in front of us every day. What could we do if we weren’t fighting this battle?

    I mean, do we really have enough candidates for President who have some hope of turning things around that we can toss out anyone, of either sex, because they’re fat?

    The cost it exacts from us all is staggering. And carefully hidden by the smoke and mirrors.

  20. New York Fashion writer Emily Nussbaum wrote a similarly-minded article on the correlation between the dwindling size of fashion models and the lack of agency they now possess in the modeling world. Check it out here. Models have dwindled in size, Nussbaum writes, because they’ve dwindled in stature – from bodacious superstars to nameless, faceless manual laborers with short shelf lives.

    They’ve gone from having all the power, to having relatively little. It’s no surprise as their autonomy has diminished, so too has their physical stature.

  21. Well, at least this article is a start, if nothing else. It’s a nice counterpoint to the “Gah! No Fat Friends!!” bullshit media epidemic.

    And when powerful, world-changing women (or *people* for that matter) take time away from making lives around the globe better…to spare a second thought for the size of their derrieres…I’m sorry, but I think that is a crying fucking shame.

  22. See the thing is Kate, you say you don’t make fun of those who are naturally slim, but you just did. Smaller bodies equals smaller ambitions? Excuse me?? That is just mean, especially because I am more ambitious than everyone I know, and i am a size 0. I hardly have zero ambition. Saying things like that is doing the same thing you tell people not to do every day: not judge and stereotype large groups of people and those who cant change how they were born. Yet you are stereotyping all small people by saying we are stupid and not ambitious.

    Thanks. Real kind of you.

  23. jdfijni, I just changed the last line to specify that I’m talking about the unrealistic pursuit of tiny bodies, not tiny bodies in general.

    I’m sorry for the confusion.

    But I certainly did not call anyone stupid, nor did I ever say naturally thin women have small ambitions.

  24. Alright then, I can accept that. I see everywhere nowadays the stereotyping of skinny people as vain, stupid, shallow, etc. and I guess we have people like Kate Moss to thank for that, but I try and straighten people out.

    I was really pissed about the whole Clinton boob thing too. So she is a woman and we have boobs. So what? Her husband had no qualms about whipping his out, but of course hey, that isn’t BOOBS BOOBS BOOBS!! God forbid a female would want to dress like one once in a while…

  25. If your only ambition is to get smaller, that’s a pretty small ambition. And in an industry that puts increasing emphasis on unrealistic tininess (unrealistic even for models, because these size zeroes are 6 feet tall, and because they’re always trying to get thinner), that’s about the only ambition you can end up having. As The Rotund points out today, getting smaller can just take up all your time and energy if you let it.

  26. Thanks for the link! A great article – just wish there had been more of it. I couldn’t help feeling queasy when she said that 15 pounds up from size 0 she was now ‘a perfectly ordinary size.’ Gyeeee….

  27. I see everywhere nowadays the stereotyping of skinny people as vain, stupid, shallow, etc.

    I was actually going to mention this, in relation to the whole thing where Hillary Clinton had to make jokes about wanting to lose weight.

    Because while on the one hand, maybe Hillary making jokes about wanting to lose weight is supposed to make her seem more like a “real woman” to female voters, the problem is that it also plays right into the hands of people who try to claim that women are too frivolous, too petty, too vain to be able to comprehend the scope of being President of the United States of America.

    Gosh, what a shocker – once again a woman is stuck in a situation best described as “damned if you do, damned if you don’t.”

  28. Katie, I’m not saying I know what her attitude is, but there was one line that seemed to be written to the exclusion of fat people. Where she specifically states that her concern is with the people between a size 0 and a size 14. Maybe it was just a turn of phrase, but it left me with a weird vibe that I gather Meowser caught on to as well. Its not definitive. Just a vibe we happened to get.

    I thought the article was right on and makes a lot of great points. I also know, though, that its possible for someone to make all of those great points without actually meaning to include fat people. Which sucks. Still, even if this author is one of those people, she didn’t feel the need many do to point out the exclusion of fat people in what they are talking about. Bad vibe or not, I found that very encouraging. A lot of people feel the need to prove their seriousness by announcing that they don’t mean us fatties. This author didn’t do that and regardless of what she actually thinks, that’s definitely a good thing.

  29. Whenever I read stuff like this I never know what to say. I mean guess I don’t understand why this is notable. Why are we rah rahing a woman who got sick, lost some wegiht and then gained some back? Aren’t there tons more women who never do this, have healthy self esteem and whose stories would be more compelling (at least to me)? Even with a 15lbs weight gain, she’s still benefitting from thin privilege. It’s still a thin person explaining to us fatties how to love ourselves. It comes off as snarky when someone who benefits so greatly from a system that has often caused me to cry myself to sleep at night, says to me, “oh just love yourself. It’s a discipline!”/ i don’t know, I just don’t really buy it. Maybe my reading of the article is way wrong, but it seemed more like she was bitter that she gained the weight and that was just a way of talking about bodies and acceptance.

  30. Aren’t there tons more women who never do this, have healthy self esteem …?

    No, not that I know of. That’s kind of the point of this blog. Whether other stories would be more compelling to you is obviously a different story, but do I believe there are “tons more” women out there who don’t have body image issues? No.

    And I think the fact that Ream said loving yourself is a discipline is exactly what distinguished this piece from the “Oh, just love yourself!” ones. I mean, she wasn’t writing a book here. Given the constraints on length, I think her paragraph about the discipline of loving yourself was pretty great, as previous commenters have said.

    I also noticed the “Tell a size 14 woman she’s gorgeous” thing and wondered what she’d say to a size 28 woman, but I didn’t find it as troublesome as others did. Ditto the “perfectly ordinary size” thing — I gave her the benefit of the doubt and interpreted that as “a perfectly ordinary size for me,” even though she’s obviously still smaller than many women. BStu and Meowser, I totally take your points — especially about people “proving their seriousness” — but I don’t think we have enough information here to determine what Ream was really thinking when she wrote that. You might be too sensitive; I might be too naive. Or it might be completely neutral. Tough to say from what we’ve got here. And I give her BIG points for not including a Bingo-worthy line to the effect of, “Obviously, being X lbs. is unhealthy, but within reason…”

    Finally, Shel, I can understand your frustration with those who benefit from thin privilege having a mouthpiece that fat women often don’t, but I also think it’s worth applauding anyone who writes thoughtfully about body image in a major newspaper. And I didn’t think she was bitter about gaining the weight back at all. If anything, I thought she was bitter about being lauded for her “health” and attractiveness when she was sick and depressed.

  31. I am with Kate here. It seemed like she had an experience which made her aware of thin privilege and she wrote about it. I think it is absolutely true that people who are thin are taken much more seriously when they make critiques like this but I’m still glad she did it and connected it to larger issues (no pun intended) about what society prizes in women.

    I don’t happen to think that working out two hours a day is a waste of time. I love working out and wish I had two hours every day that I could devote to it. But, were I President, it might be low on my priority list. I’ve also heard stories that Bush is authoritarian about bodies as well as about the rest of the world. He supposedly expresses disgust or disappointment at less-than-fit staffers. I guess he’s making up for years of boozing (and coking. allegedly). It’s a shame he has nothing better to know than moralize about others’ bodies.

    And I just want to echo the “damned if you do…” point about Hillary. Women are constantly judged by their appearance but their attention to appearance is taken as evidence of their triviality.

  32. I don’t happen to think that working out two hours a day is a waste of time. I love working out and wish I had two hours every day that I could devote to it. But, were I President, it might be low on my priority list.

    The last sentence is exactly what I meant. I mean, I try to get in 90 minutes of yoga a day (though I don’t, often enough) — but I’M NOT PRESIDENT. If the average person who works a 9-5 office job is frequently too busy and tired to get to the gym, I bloody well hope the president is.

  33. Shel, I didn’t read her as bitter about regaining the weight at all–I think she was incredulous that people were congratulating her on (essentially) being ill and depressed. I recently lost weight due to a months-long ailment that has been a giant pain in the ass; if anyone tells me how great I look, I’m inclined punch her in the face.

  34. It’s frightening to see how much women are still controlled by body-image. And disturbing that millions of people in the third world are starving to death, while rich women in the first world are actually paying money to diet and train themselves to death, just to fit in with what ‘society’ deems to be the correct body image. Seems like getting the right to vote was only part of battle…

    I had to look up what a size 0 is – I live in the UK, where it’s equivalent to a size 4. At the moment, you’d be hard pushed to find size 4 clothes over here – but not doubt it will come.

    I blame the shallow, celebrity and fashion-obsessed magazines that just fuel this kind of insanity, as well as films like ‘The Devil Wears Prada’, which despite seeming to poke fun at the fashion industry still allows the protagonist to celebrate going from a size 6 (UK 10) to a size 4 (UK 8). So from healthily trim to a bit on the skinny side!

  35. The good thing, though, is that Ream didn’t try to prove her seriousness by throwing fat people under the bus. Even with a sense that she might think, “Oh, I don’t mean you,” she at least didn’t say it outright. And I will say that I didn’t read her as bitter about gaining the weight back. It seemed clear to me that her bitterness was directed at the reaction she got when lost weight.

  36. “I had to look up what a size 0 is – I live in the UK, where it’s equivalent to a size 4. At the moment, you’d be hard pushed to find size 4 clothes over here – but not doubt it will come.”

    See, hte problem I feel lately is that people think that including such sizes is encouraging anorexia, but I think that for those of us who just naturally fit those sizes, it is unfair to exclude us…just like it would be unfair to not include a size 20 for fear it would “encourage obesity.” Especially because neither of those things are true. Just because a place stocks a certainsize doesn’t mean EVERYONE has to have it, just like if my favorite store started stocking stripper-esque clothing I wouldn’t want to by it solely because they stock it.

    Then again, Abercrombie has already gone there and back…

  37. I don’t know…I suppose I see it as no woman, despite her size, is EVER happy. It’s a constant battle.

    Rewarding a woman who lost weight due to depression, illness or other seems severely skewed to me. I believe this is partly what this article is pointing out. There are women who will be a natural 0, 2, 4, 6…etc. But to neclect your health and spirit strictly to conform to a standard is insane.

    Of course continuing to push this ideal keeps women focused on issue that, when you stop and think, really has no bearing on your overall quality of life. Why do we continue to be inherently unhappy with ourselves over something so miniscule, when we have ONE shot at this life? Perhaps taking the discipline we focus on dieting, exercise, self-hate and directing it towards rewarding ourselves for who we are is the key to happiness.

  38. Oh, believe me Kate, I’m happy it was published at all. Telling a size 14 she’s gorgeous is better than a size 14 usually gets. But I tell you, my thought was, “OK, maybe if I lose 50 pounds, I can wear a size 14 again and be something resembling ‘normal.’ Where’s that South Beach Diet book again?” Prolly not the response you’d be after, I take it.

  39. This post was awesome – and right on target. Right after reading it, I went to check out my Flickr pages and came across a picture someone had captured of a couple doing the tango. I think it’s a relatively nice shot, myself.

    You can see it here

    If you scroll down through the comments, it takes about 5 or so before someone wonders why the “well dressed man” is dancing with the “well, you now … full figured woman.”

    WHAT.THE.FUCK.

    That comment summed up so much of what you talk about – between thinking that no man in his right mind would ever want to dance with a fat woman and the fact that a woman who looks to be a pretty healthy and normal size to me is considered “full-figured.”

    Apparently, unless you’re a woman who weighs less than a healthy middle-schooler, you’re taking up too much fricking space and no one will want to dance with or desire you.

    What a bunch of horseshit. Grumble.

  40. Nice article, it’s pretty sad that a serious woman, and presidential candidate had to stoop to that, but she’s trying to be “one of the people”, and the people are screwed up. Especially on the internet, where there’s barely any repercussions when manners are at their worst.

    That flickr post disturbed me as well. I like to believe there’s a person out there for everyone, and if we were left to our own it wouldn’t matter who is fat or thin. Too many people are raised with commercials these days.

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  42. All thoughts about Senator Hillary being a strategist above all else aside, I’ve decided, after much ruminating on the subject, that one of the primary reasons that “Every Woman Has an Eating Disorder” and why we are so obsessed with women’s fat in American culture, is not so much that women are comparatively big, but that — with our, I think, equivalent obsession with polar, simplistic, sound-bite analysis — men are consumed with their OWN fear of being comparatively small.

    (Please extrapolate to apply as you see appropriate.)

    (Also, I speak, of course, in generalities for the sake of a cohesive theory – not ALL men, for those lovely occasional browsers/readers poised to rant about ad hoc and ad hominem.)

    And that given American male obsession with machoness, and ruggedry, and stature, and who has more more more, that a lot of the rest — women’s status being based on their ability to be physically & emotionally fragile and delicate (size 00? Size -2? Not, of course, that if you’re that size naturally that there’s anything wrong with that), and not “loud”, and all the trophy wife/GF BS — is collateral fallout.

  43. “Hint: nobody remarked that she looked sick.”

    THIS IS WHAT INFURIATES ME!!

    I am underweight, sickly, and suffering from a chronic disease. I get compliments all the time for being “so thin” and “looking good”. More than I ever get when I’m healthy. I’M SICK!! But the average person seems to think that looking sickly is looking good. People actually tell me I am LUCKY to have a disease that “keeps me thin.” What is wrong with this picture?

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